The Corks.

There are 19 corks, one for each of the 19 crimes a person could commit to be sentenced to "Punishment by Transportation." The corks, which are randomly distributed with the bottles, have the name of the crime on the side. What crimes will you uncork tonight?

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Corks of the 19 Crimes

Interesting fact...

Read Sir Robert Peel's speech from 1910 on criminal reform.

Interesting fact...

Abolished in 1827 when "simple larceny" removed the distinction between petty and grand larceny.

Interesting fact...

An Act again "Pawnbroking" was passed by James I, targeting counterfeit brokers.

Interesting fact...

Out of the 15,379 court cases heard at the Old Bailey Courthouse between 1780 and 1800, 13,789 fell under the categories of theft and violent theft.

Interesting fact...

16th century England began the criminalization of "The Wandering People." Eventually it became a felon to even impersonate one.

Interesting fact...

Blankets, bed covers, and sheets were woven, stamped or taped with "LCC" (London County Council) to deter theft.

Interesting fact...

"Underwood" is an olde english term for the undergrowth in a forest.

Interesting fact...

In 1767 it became a felony, without benefit of clergy, to rob mail or steal letters from the Post.

Interesting fact...

In the nineteenth century, as society became less tolerant of violence, two statutes turned the most serious offences into felonies.

Interesting fact...

This crime is still going on in the UK, with reports of stealing fish being front page news in 2015.

Interesting fact...

Theft was a common law offence, but there was a large number of statutes which mandated specific punishments for particular types of theft.

Interesting fact...

Due to the divorce laws in existence in the 19th Century, bigamy was a common occurrence.

Interesting fact...

Because of fashion trends and materials, women’s clothes in the 19th century were highly flammable.

Interesting fact...

The full title of this law was An act for the more effectual preventing the counterfeiting of the current coin of this kingdom, and the uttering or paying of false or counterfeit coin.

Interesting fact...

The passing of Hardwicke’s marriage act in 1753.

Interesting fact...

This was not because shrouds were particularly valuable or desirable, but because a corpse was officially not property, and therefore could not be stolen.

Interesting fact...

In the 16th century, Acts of Parliament regulated the watermen working on the tidal Thames between Gravesend and Windsor.

Interesting fact...

An incorrigible rogue is also anyone that was previously convicted as a rogue or vagabond, and resists apprehension.

Interesting fact...

Naval stores are all products derived from pine sap, which are used to manufacture soap, paint, varnish, shoe polish, linoleum, and roofing materials.