John Boyle O'Reilly

"Only those who have stood within the bars and heard the din of devils and the appalling sounds of despair can imagine the horrors of the hold of a convict ship." - John Boyle O'Reilly

Some men overcome adversity. Others make an art of it. In 1867 John Boyle O'Reilly was given a sentence second only to death in its severity: transportation. O'Reilly, however, was no ordinary convict. He published poetry throughout the harrowing journey to Australia and, once there, outwitted prison guards to escape to America.

Michael Harrington

A British conscript turned infamous convict, Michael Harrington is perhaps best known for orchestrating one of the most daring escapes from Australia. In 1876, Harrington, along with six others, braved a massive typhoon in nothing more than a tiny rowboat to board an American whaling ship in what is now remembered as the "Catalpa Rescue."

James Wilson

"Remember this is a voice from the tomb. For is this not a living tomb?" - James Wilson

Though his early life is shrouded in mystery, James Wilson's time in Australia is immortalized in his letter "A Voice from the Tomb" which describes the penal colony experience in vivid detail. It was this letter that proved instrumental in setting in motion the great "Catalpa Rescue."

Cornelius Dwyer Kane

Cornelius Dwyer Kane (aka Keane) (1839-1891) had been a law clerk and cener from Skibbereen, County Cork, Ireland. Transported aboard the Hougoumont, Kane was conditionally pardoned in 1871, but was forbidden from returning to Ireland, so he never reunited with his wife and children there. He did, however, settle in Queensland and became a civil servant.

James Kiely

James also played a part in the “Catalpa Rescue”, which obviously didn’t go to plan. He was convicted, sent to Western Australia “for life” imprisonment, however he was granted a pardon by the King in 1905. There’s a great article on Trove about this here.